Who is this class for: The target audience consists of health care practitioners in the fields of gastroenterology, medical oncology, pathology, psychiatry, pulmonary medicine, radiation oncology, radiology, and thoracic surgery. The course should be of interest to practicing physicians, doctors in training (e.g. senior medical students, residents, fellows), and other clinicians, including nurse practitioners, physician assistants, etc. The core curriculum will give learners a base of knowledge and understanding to draw and build upon in their day to day clinical activities in thoracic cancer care.


Created by:  University of Michigan

LevelAdvanced
Commitment7 weeks of study, 2-4 hours/week
Language
English
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
4.8 stars
Average User Rating 4.8See what learners said
Syllabus

FAQs
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Coursework
Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

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Creators
University of Michigan
The mission of the University of Michigan is to serve the people of Michigan and the world through preeminence in creating, communicating, preserving and applying knowledge, art, and academic values, and in developing leaders and citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future.
Ratings and Reviews
Rated 4.8 out of 5 of 43 ratings

Excellent course .

A very comprehensive overview of lung and esophageal cancer, from risk factors, to diagnosis, staging, surgery, palliative care, psychological support and pain management. I thoroughly enjoyed participating in this excellently presented course.

As a pediatric oncologist, I have not had to deal with either lung or esophageal cancers.

The use of endoscopic analysis for determining lymph node involvement was quite an eye-opener.

Likewise, the immunologic histochemical variation was a valuable learning experience as were the

pathologic descriptions of adenoca variants.

The only possible criticism might be the thoracic surgeons use of acronyms without explanation, but

this was minor.

Kudos to the team

Gratefully Gerald Vladimer MD

Very important, helpful and very very well done. Thanks a lot