About University of Pennsylvania

About University of Pennsylvania

"The noblest question in the world is: What good may I do in it?" - Ben Franklin, Founder of the University of Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania is a private, research-intensive university located in West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Penn traces its origin to 1740 and continues to pursue the principles of its founder, Benjamin Franklin: invention, outreach, entrepreneurship, innovation, and the pragmatic unity of theory and practice. Penn’s educational offerings balance the arts and sciences with the professions.

About The School of Engineering and Applied Science

About The School of Engineering and Applied Science

The School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn Engineering) prepares students for leadership roles in a technological world where creativity, critical quantitative thinking, effective communication skills and a strong commitment to humane values are essential. Established in 1852 as the School of Mines, Arts and Manufactures, Penn Engineering is among the oldest and most respected engineering schools in the United States.

Penn Engineering has a rich tradition of leading the field of computer science. In 1946 the first general purpose digital computer, the ENIAC, was built at Penn and in 1965 the Department of Computer and Information Science awarded the first doctoral degree in Computer Science. Penn Engineering continues this tradition today through leadership and cutting-edge research in fields from autonomous robots to embedded systems and IoT. With six academic departments and numerous interdisciplinary centers, institutes, and laboratories, Penn Engineering graduates close to 1,000 students each year and has a worldwide alumni network of more than 28,000.

167

YEAR HISTORY

1st

COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT TO AWARD A DOCTORAL DEGREE

$110M

ANNUAL RESEARCH EXPENDITURES

Featured Faculty

Arvind Bhusnurmath

Arvind Bhusnurmath

Director, Master of Computer and Information Technology and Senior Lecturer, Department of Computer and Information Science

Arvind is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Computer and Information Science. He teaches a mixture of graduate and undergraduate courses and is currently the director of the on-campus Master of Computer and Information Technology (MCIT) program. Arvind received his PhD from the CIS department in 2008 for research done under the auspices of the GRASP lab and spent 5 years in the software industry working for APT.

Susan Davidson

Susan Davidson

Weiss Professor, Department of Computer and Information Science

Susan B. Davidson is the Weiss Professor of Computer and Information Science (CIS) at the University of Pennsylvania, where she has been since 1982. Dr. Davidson received the B.A. degree in Mathematics from Cornell University in 1978, and the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Princeton University in 1980 and 1982. Dr. Davidson's research interests include database and web-based systems, scientific data management, provenance, crowdsourcing, and data citation.

Tom Farmer

Tom Farmer

Senior Lecturer, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering and Department of Computer and Information Science

Thomas Farmer is a Lecturer in Electrical and Systems Engineering, and Computer and Information Science at Penn Engineering. Tom received his PhD in Computer Engineering from The George Washington University (2010) and his MS in Computer Science from The City University of New York-College (2002). Tom's research focus is in the area of radio frequency integrated circuits (RFIC) in CMOS, BiCMOS, or III-V technologies. He is primarily engaged in researching RF and digital integrated circuits for microwave and millimeter-wave communication systems, radar systems, and imaging systems. In his work, Tom is interested in finding creative ways to yield higher RF output power from power amplifiers made in silicon-based IC technologies at millimeter-wave frequencies, through innovative circuit design, while still achieving high linearity, efficiency, and gain.

Zack Ives

Zack Ives

Department Chair and Adani President's Distinguished Professor, Department of Computer and Information Science

Zachary Ives is the Department Chair and Adani President's Distinguished Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a co-founder of [Blackfynn, Inc.](https://www.blackfynn.com/ "blackfynn"), a company focused on enabling life sciences research and discovery through data integration. Zack's research interests include data integration and sharing, managing "big data," sensor networks, and data provenance and authoritativeness. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER award, and an alumnus of the DARPA Computer Science Study Panel and Information Science and Technology advisory panel. He has also been awarded the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching. He is a co-author of the textbook Principles of Data Integration, and has received an ICDE 2013 ten-year Most Influential Paper award as well as the 2017 SWSA Ten-Year Award at the International Semantic Web Conference.

Sampath Kannan

Sampath Kannan

Co-Director, Online Master of Computer and Information Technology and Henry Salvatori Professor, Department of Computer and Information Science

Sampath is the Henry Salvatori Professor and Department Chair in the Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania. Sampath's research spans several subfields in algorithms. In his work on massive data set algorithms, Sampath explores what can be computed efficiently, and what is not computable. He is also interested in program checking, a paradigm for ensuring the correctness of a program by observing its behavior at run-time, and in algorithmic problems in computational biology, particularly the problem of reconstructing the evolutionary history of a set of species from phenotypic and molecular sequence observations.

Bongho Kim

Bongho Kim

Lecturer, Department of Computer and Information Science

Bongho Kim is a senior researcher in Nokia Bell Labs' Wireless Access Network Research in Murray Hill, New Jersey. Bongho received both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science and engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1997 and 2016, and received B.S. with honors in computer and information science from The Ohio State University in 1995. He also received both B.S. and M.S. in the earth and marine science from the Han Yang University, Korea in 1989 and 1991. Bongho has been working on the Mobile network systems design, Standardization, Network and protocol architecture design. His research interests include 5G wireless technologies, RAN/Network slicing, IoT, Cross-protocol layer performance optimization, Multi-Radio Access Technology, and Application performance enhancement over wireless networks. He has received a number of awards including the Proud Eagle Award from Lucent Technologies and the WiMAX Forum individual contribution award. He holds 20 issued and pending patents in the area of wireless networks and algorithms design.

Boon Thau Loo

Boon Thau Loo

Associate Dean, Master's and Professional Programs School of Engineering and Applied Science Professor, Department of Computer and Information Science

Boon Thau Loo is the RCA Professor in the Computer and Information Science (CIS) department at the University of Pennsylvania. He holds a secondary appointment in the Electrical and Systems Engineering (ESE) department. He is also the Associate Dean of the Master’s and Professional Programs, where he oversees all master’s programs at the School of Engineering and Applied Science. He received his Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the University of California at Berkeley in 2006. Prior to his Ph.D., he received his M.S. degree from Stanford University in 2000, and his B.S. degree with highest honors from University of California-Berkeley in 1999. He leads the NetDB@Penn research team, and is also currently the director of the Distributed Systems Laboratory (DSL), an inter-disciplinary systems research lab bringing together researchers in networking, distributed systems, and security. His research focuses on distributed data management systems, Internet-scale query processing, and the application of data-centric techniques and formal methods to the design, analysis and implementation of networked systems.

Chris Murphy

Chris Murphy

Co-Director, Online Master of Computer and Information Technology and Associate Professor of Practice, Department of Computer and Information Science

Chris Murphy has been a teaching-track faculty member at the University of Pennsylvania since 2010, and is co-director of the Online Masters of Computer & Information Technology program. Prior to joining Penn, Chris completed a PhD in Computer Science at Columbia University, where his research focused on software testing. Before that, he worked as a professional software developer in Boston, San Francisco, and London after earning a BS in Computer Engineering from Boston University. His academic interests include online education, student contributions to open source software projects, and how these affect diversity and inclusion within CS.

Mayur Naik

Mayur Naik

Associate Professor, Department of Computer and Information Science

Mayur is an Associate Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania. He received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University in 2008, where his advisor was Alex Aiken, and an M.S. from Purdue University in 2003, where his advisor was Jens Palsberg. He was a researcher at Intel Labs, Berkeley from 2008 to 2011, and an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Georgia Tech from 2011 to 2016. The overarching goal of Mayur’s research is to develop effective computer-aided approaches for improving software quality and programmer productivity. His research group is exploring ways to achieve this goal by deeply integrating machine learning and symbolic reasoning.

Jianbo Shi

Jianbo Shi

Professor, Computer and Information Science (CIS)

Jianbo Shi is a Professor of Computer and Information Science (CIS) at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his B.A. in Computer Science & Mathematics from Cornell University in 1994, and his Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley in 1998. Jianbo is a member of the General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception (GRASP) Lab at Penn Engineering, where his group is developing vision algorithms for both human and image recognition. Their ultimate goal is to develop computation algorithms to understand human behavior and interaction with objects in video, and to do so at multiple levels of abstractions: from the basic body limb tracking, to human identification, gesture recognition, and activity inference. Jianbo and his group are working to develop a visual thinking model that allows computers not only to understand their surroundings, but also to achieve higher level cognitive abilities such as machine memory and learning.

Val Tannen

Val Tannen

Professor, Department of Computer and Information Science

Val Tannen is a professor in the Department of Computer and Information Science of the University of Pennsylvania. Val's work is centered around data management technologies and their applications in life sciences. He and his group are currently working on models and systems for data sharing, data provenance and uncertain information. His research has been applied in genomics and bioinformatics as well as in phyloinformatics and systematic biology. Val's past work also includes research in programming languages and high-performance computing. In addition, he maintains a special interest in applications of mathematical logic to computer science.

  • Money
    $25,000 (tuition) + $1,300 (fees)
  • Clock
    16-40 months
  • Graph
    10 courses
  • Globe
    Completely online

Applications for the Fall 2020 cohort open on January 2nd.

The early application deadline is March 1st.

The final application deadline is May 1st.

Coursera does not grant credit, and does not represent that any institution other than the degree granting institution will recognize the credit or credential awarded by the institution; the decision to grant, accept, or transfer credit is subject to the sole and absolute discretion of an educational institution.

We encourage you to investigate whether this degree meets your academic and/or professional needs before applying.

Try before you Apply

Penn Engineering offers an online Computational Thinking for Problem Solving course on Coursera to help you decide whether the program is the right fit before you apply.

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