Dr. Jennifer M. Groh, Ph.D.



<p>Jennifer M. Groh is interested in how the brain process spatial information in different sensory systems, and how the brain's spatial codes influence other aspects of cognition. &nbsp;She is the author of a recent book entitled "<a href="" title="Link:">Making Space: &nbsp;How the Brain Knows Where Things Are</a>" (Harvard University Press, fall 2014).</p> <p>Much of her research concerns differences in how the visual and auditory systems encode location, and how vision influences hearing. &nbsp;Her laboratory has demonstrated that neurons in auditory brain regions are sometimes responsive not just to what we hear but also to what direction we are looking and what visual stimuli we can see. &nbsp;These surprising findings challenge the prevailing assumption that the brain’s sensory pathways remain separate and distinct from each other at early stages, and suggest a mechanism for such multi-sensory interactions as lip-reading and ventriloquism (the capture of perceived sound location by a plausible nearby visual stimulus).</p> <p>Dr. Groh has been a professor at Duke University since 2006. &nbsp;She received her undergraduate degree in biology from Princeton University in 1988 before studying neuroscience at the University of Michigan (Master’s, 1990), the University of Pennsylvania (Ph.D., 1993), and Stanford University (postdoctoral, 1994-1997). &nbsp;Dr. Groh has been teaching undergraduate classes on the neural basis of perception and memory for over fifteen years. &nbsp;She is presently a faculty member at the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences at Duke University. &nbsp;She also holds appointments in the Departments of Neurobiology and Psychology &amp; Neuroscience at Duke.<br></p> <p>Dr. Groh’s research has been supported by a variety of sources including the John S. Guggenheim Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program, the McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience, the John Merck Scholars Program, the EJLB Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Whitehall Foundation, and the National Organization for Hearing Research.<br></p> <p><br></p>


The Brain and Space

The Brain and Space

Neuroscience: Perception, Action and the Brain Capstone