Case Western Reserve University
Introduction to International Criminal Law
Case Western Reserve University

Introduction to International Criminal Law

Taught in English

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177,691 already enrolled

Course

Gain insight into a topic and learn the fundamentals

Michael Scharf

Instructor: Michael Scharf

4.8

(3,664 reviews)

12 hours to complete
3 weeks at 4 hours a week
Flexible schedule
Learn at your own pace

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Assessments

2 quizzes

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There are 8 modules in this course

This introduction will give the learner a brief outline as to how the course is structured, how it will be graded and the ideal pace at which the course should be completed. This module includes a primer on international law that will introduce students with limited backgrounds on international law to the basic foundations of the field. This lesson also includes a video lecture and readings that outline the brief history of international criminal law starting with the Nuremberg Trials. Lastly, this module explores the legacy of the Nuremberg Court and lets students apply the lessons learned from Nuremberg to a fictional fact pattern through a set of simulations.

What's included

1 video12 readings

This lesson includes a video lecture and readings that elaborate on the tensions between peace and justice in international law and diplomacy. This lesson specifically explores the limits placed on the international duty to prosecute certain crimes and surveys the breaches of international law that require a duty to prosecute.

What's included

1 video1 reading

This lesson includes a video lecture and readings that discuss the international definition of terrorism and why reaching such a definition has become a divisive issue in international law. This lesson further discusses the intricacies of the modern international classifications of piracy. Lastly, this lesson includes a simulation that allows students to apply the issues discussed in the readings and lecture to a fictional UN conference.

What's included

1 video2 readings

This lesson contains a video lecture and readings that explore the unique attributes of different forms of criminal responsibility in international law including command responsibility, joint criminal liability, control of the crime doctrine and incitement. This lesson also involves a simulation that allows students to apply the issues discussed in the readings and lecture to a fictional fact pattern.

What's included

1 video3 readings1 quiz

This lesson includes a video lecture and readings that discuss the different defenses that exist for accused persons tried under international law. This lesson specifically explores the defenses of mental defect, intoxication, obedience to orders and head of state immunity. This lesson also includes a set of simulations that allow students to apply the issues discussed in the readings and lecture to two real life scenarios.

What's included

1 video3 readings

This lesson includes a video lecture and readings that explore the options countries have in attempting to gain custody over an accused person under international law. Specifically, the lesson discusses countries’ use of tactics like abduction, luring, extradition and targeted killing. This lesson also includes a set of simulations that allow students to apply the issues discussed in the readings and lecture to one fictional fact pattern and one real life scenario.

What's included

1 video3 readings

This lesson includes a video lecture and readings that examine the major pre-trial issues that are presented in international courts. Specifically, this lesson analyzes the problems that come from self-representation, plea-bargaining and the exclusion of evidence. This lesson also includes a set of simulations that allow students to apply the issues discussed in the readings and lecture to two real life issues that have come before international tribunals.

What's included

1 video3 readings

This lesson includes a video lecture and readings on how, in the face of the problems discussed in the previous lesson, order is maintained in modern international courtrooms. The lesson also includes a simulation that allows students to apply the issues discussed in the readings and lecture to a fictional fact pattern.

What's included

1 video3 readings1 quiz

Instructor

Instructor ratings
4.8 (927 ratings)
Michael Scharf
Case Western Reserve University
1 Course177,691 learners

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