L&T EduTech
Welding Processes in Heavy Manufacturing & Quality Controls
L&T EduTech

Welding Processes in Heavy Manufacturing & Quality Controls

This course is part of Heavy Manufacturing Specialization

Course

Gain insight into a topic and learn the fundamentals

Intermediate level

Recommended experience

8 hours (approximately)
Flexible schedule
Learn at your own pace

Course

Gain insight into a topic and learn the fundamentals

Intermediate level

Recommended experience

8 hours (approximately)
Flexible schedule
Learn at your own pace

See how employees at top companies are mastering in-demand skills

Placeholder

Build your subject-matter expertise

This course is part of the Heavy Manufacturing Specialization
When you enroll in this course, you'll also be enrolled in this Specialization.
  • Learn new concepts from industry experts
  • Gain a foundational understanding of a subject or tool
  • Develop job-relevant skills with hands-on projects
  • Earn a shareable career certificate
Placeholder
Placeholder

Earn a career certificate

Add this credential to your LinkedIn profile, resume, or CV

Share it on social media and in your performance review

Placeholder

There are 3 modules in this course

The welding process is fundamental in the manufacturing of process plant equipment, ensuring the integrity and reliability of critical components. Several welding techniques are employed, each offering unique advantages and applications tailored to specific requirements. Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), commonly known as stick welding, utilizes a flux-coated electrode to join metals, making it versatile and suitable for various materials and environments. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), or TIG welding, produces high-quality welds with precise control over heat input, making it ideal for thin and delicate materials used in process plant equipment. Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), also known as MIG welding, is a versatile process suitable for both manual and automated applications, offering high deposition rates and excellent weld quality. Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW) is similar to GMAW but uses a tubular electrode filled with flux, providing increased productivity and penetration in heavy manufacturing applications. Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) utilizes a granular flux to shield the arc and weld pool, producing high-quality welds with minimal spatter, making it suitable for thick materials and high-speed production. Electro Slag Strip Cladding (ESW Strip Cladding) and Submerged Arc Strip Cladding (SASC) are specialized welding processes used for applying corrosion-resistant coatings to process plant equipment components. Plasma Arc Welding uses a confined arc and inert gas shielding to create exact and high-quality welds, making it perfect for thin and precision components in process plant equipment. Laser Beam Welding and Electron Beam Welding employ highly focused beams of energy to melt and combine metals with little distortion, making them ideal for precision welding in process plant equipment. Resistance welding uses the resistance of workpieces to generate heat and fuse them together, resulting in fast and effective welding of components in process plant equipment. Additive Manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, is a cutting-edge technique that uses layers of material to manufacture complex components with great precision and customization, revolutionizing the production of delicate accessories in process plant equipment. Manufacturers can improve the effectiveness and safety of industrial operations by ensuring the quality, dependability, and performance of process plant equipment by comprehending and mastering these welding processes.

What's included

15 videos1 assignment

In heavy manufacturing, special welding practices and post-weld treatment procedures play a crucial role in ensuring the quality, integrity, and performance of welded components. Thermite welding, a highly specialized technique, uses a chemical reaction to generate intense heat, enabling the joining of heavy steel structures, and other large components with minimal distortion and heat-affected zones. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process that produces high-strength welds in materials traditionally considered difficult to weld, such as aluminum and other non-ferrous alloys, by mechanically stirring the materials at the joint interface. Tandem welding is appropriate for heavy manufacturing applications demanding large volumes of welded components since it involves the simultaneous operation of two welding heads, improving productivity and deposition rates while maintaining weld quality. Multipass welding involves the sequential deposition of multiple weld passes to achieve full joint penetration and proper fusion, ensuring the integrity and strength of welded components in heavy manufacturing. Explosive welding is perfect for combining materials with drastically different properties because it uses controlled explosions to bond two dissimilar metals together. This process produces strong, flawless joins without the need for heat. Welding parameters such as current, voltage, travel speed, and shielding gas flow are critical in achieving quality welds, minimizing defects, and optimizing productivity in heavy manufacturing applications. Post-weld treatment procedures, including stress relieving, normalizing, and tempering, are essential for reducing residual stresses, improving material properties, and enhancing the durability and reliability of welded components. Furnaces of various kinds, including as gas, electric, and induction furnaces, are used for heat treatment procedures like normalizing, tempering, and relieving stress. These processes involve regulated cycles of heating and cooling to give welded components the right material qualities. By incorporating special welding practices and post-weld treatment procedures into heavy manufacturing processes, manufacturers can ensure the quality, integrity, and service life of welded components, contributing to the overall efficiency and reliability of industrial operations.

What's included

11 videos1 assignment

In heavy manufacturing, quality control methods and automation are essential for guaranteeing the dependability, effectiveness, and safety of welded components. An introduction to quality control lays the groundwork for upholding uniform standards and fulfilling regulatory requirements all across the production process. To ensure that components are easily assessable for quality checks at every level of production, design for inspection principles are implemented from start to finish. Non-destructive testing methods, like magnetic particle inspection, radiography testing, and ultrasonic testing, enable a comprehensive assessment of the weld quality without compromising the integrity of the welded components. These methods are crucial for identifying material flaws, discontinuities, and internal flaws that might threaten the weld's structural integrity. Phased array ultrasonics and eddy current testing are two examples of specialised non-destructive inspection techniques that offer sophisticated capabilities for identifying and characterising flaws in intricate geometries and materials, offering thorough quality assurance in heavy manufacturing. Standards and norms guarantee uniformity, dependability, and safety in heavy manufacturing operations by offering guidelines and requirements for welding methods, inspection procedures, and acceptance criteria. Dimensional checks make sure that welded components are accurate and precise and that they adhere to tolerances and design criteria. Destructive testing, such as bending and tensile testing, evaluates the performance and mechanical characteristics of welds under severe conditions and offers important information about the integrity and quality of the weld. Heavy industrial processes are revolutionized by automation in welding and the Internet of Things (IoT) by improving uniformity, productivity, and data-driven decision-making. Real-time monitoring and control of welding parameters is made possible by automated welding systems with sensors, cameras, and data analytics capabilities. This ensures constant weld quality and reduces faults. Incorporating quality control techniques, automation, and IoT 4.0 technologies into heavy manufacturing processes ensures the production of high-quality welded components that meet stringent standards and performance requirements. By embracing these advancements, manufacturers can enhance efficiency, reduce costs, and maintain a competitive edge in the global marketplace.

What's included

28 videos1 assignment

Instructor

Subject Matter Expert
L&T EduTech
67 Courses24,055 learners

Offered by

L&T EduTech

Recommended if you're interested in Mechanical Engineering

Why people choose Coursera for their career

Felipe M.
Learner since 2018
"To be able to take courses at my own pace and rhythm has been an amazing experience. I can learn whenever it fits my schedule and mood."
Jennifer J.
Learner since 2020
"I directly applied the concepts and skills I learned from my courses to an exciting new project at work."
Larry W.
Learner since 2021
"When I need courses on topics that my university doesn't offer, Coursera is one of the best places to go."
Chaitanya A.
"Learning isn't just about being better at your job: it's so much more than that. Coursera allows me to learn without limits."
Placeholder

Open new doors with Coursera Plus

Unlimited access to 7,000+ world-class courses, hands-on projects, and job-ready certificate programs - all included in your subscription

Advance your career with an online degree

Earn a degree from world-class universities - 100% online

Join over 3,400 global companies that choose Coursera for Business

Upskill your employees to excel in the digital economy

Frequently asked questions