Created by:   Emory University

Commitment5 weeks of study, 1-3 hours/week
Language
English, Subtitles: Spanish
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
4.8 stars
Average User Rating 4.8See what learners said
Syllabus

FAQs
How It Works
Coursework
Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

Help from Your Peers
Help from Your Peers

Connect with thousands of other learners and debate ideas, discuss course material, and get help mastering concepts.

Certificates
Certificates

Earn official recognition for your work, and share your success with friends, colleagues, and employers.

Creators
Emory University
Emory University, located in Atlanta, Georgia, is one of the world's leading research universities. Its mission is to create, preserve, teach and apply knowledge in the service of humanity.
Ratings and Reviews
Rated 4.8 out of 5 of 83 ratings

Amazing course. Thank you for sharing!

I loved being able to hear directly from the leaders of the civil rights movement. The course videos were short enough that I got through the course in two Saturday afternoons. The stories interwove historical events and insights, practical strategies for mobilizing, and inspiring/moving confessions of light in even the darkest times.

Some of my favorite parts included learning about the following:

-Jails were used as active classrooms for university students! They even shared info on college access with a jail ward. Crazy.

-The civil rights leaders honored all people's dignity and believed in their mission beyond what seemed to be in front of their eyes. Who would have thought that the jailed students would sing to jail staff by name, that they'd build a relationship with them, that they'd sing songs of such conviction to uplift their spirits and to warn the system to "be prepared" for the many more who'd soon join their movement.

-Andrew Young's confession about what his wife told him after they read about Dr. Lafayette, essentially "drop everything, we gotta go back home NOW." Their sacrifice and courage, even when they had everything set up for them in the North, are incredible to witness.

-The cross-continental influences! I ddin't know Jim Lawson was a divinity school student, who ended up learning non-violence in India where he lived 3 years as a missionary. The intersection of faith, social justice, calling, cross-cultural sharing/empowering were themes I found unable to shake from my mind days after I finished this course.

-The civil rights movement was fiercely organized and executed. It didn't happen accidently over night, or by fury or whim of young folks alone. Even the young - so many of the leaders were so young!!! - had a very clear strategy to winning against structural racism, and even their sacrifices "dares" so to speak were planned and not foolish. They knew what dangers or threats there may be, but it was always with a clear goal and purpose that they put themselves in the act of civil disobedience.

I will be spending my upcoming months going through the readings, books, and independent research to learn more about the civil rights movements and its leaders. I was not taught any of this in detail in highschool, which I feel that it should!!! This course is timely, and much needed, as it's been disparaging to try to remain engaged and active under Trumplandia. Thank you to those who lived this history. Thank you SO MUCH for translating your experiences into another digestible course, so that less informed folks like me can encounter (albeit late) your bravery, intelligence, and accomplishments which should never be forgotten.

A profound analysis of the Civil Rights Movement, told from the perspective of an active participant.

This is a marvelous and very inspiring course. Thank you so much!