About this Course
4.6
79 ratings
28 reviews
100% online

100% online

Start instantly and learn at your own schedule.
Flexible deadlines

Flexible deadlines

Reset deadlines in accordance to your schedule.
Beginner Level

Beginner Level

Hours to complete

Approx. 8 hours to complete

Suggested: 2-3 hours/ week...
Available languages

English

Subtitles: English...
100% online

100% online

Start instantly and learn at your own schedule.
Flexible deadlines

Flexible deadlines

Reset deadlines in accordance to your schedule.
Beginner Level

Beginner Level

Hours to complete

Approx. 8 hours to complete

Suggested: 2-3 hours/ week...
Available languages

English

Subtitles: English...

Syllabus - What you will learn from this course

Week
1
Hours to complete
1 hour to complete

Course Introduction and Schelling's Segregation Model

This week will introduce students to agent-based modeling and social network theory. We will present one of the earliest and most famous agent-based models, Thomas Schelling’s model of segregation, which shows how segregation can emerge in a population even when people individually prefer diversity. This week will demonstrate this model both conceptually and with NetLogo, and illustrate how agent-based models can be used to demonstrate sufficient conditions for the emergence of social phenomena....
Reading
7 videos (Total 20 min), 1 quiz
Video7 videos
1.1 The Substantive Problem: Micromotives and Macrobehavior1m
1.2 What are Agent-Based Models?2m
1.3 Formal Model of Segregation1m
1.4 Exploring Schelling's Segregation Model1m
1.5 How to Download and Use NetLogo2m
1.6 Using NetLogo: Schelling's Segregation Model4m
Quiz1 practice exercise
Week 116m
Week
2
Hours to complete
1 hour to complete

Diffusion in Small Worlds

This week will introduce students to social network theory and the “small worlds” paradox. We will introduce contagion models of diffusion, and discuss how network structure can impact the speed with which information spreads through a population. This week includes both high level conceptual overviews of social network theory, explaining how networks are used to represent complex social relationships, as well as technical descriptions of two basic types of networks....
Reading
7 videos (Total 25 min), 1 quiz
Video7 videos
2.2 Introduction to Network Science5m
2.3 Types of Networks: Lattice Graph5m
2.4 Types of Networks: Random Graph4m
2.5 Using NetLogo: Properties of the Small World Network2m
2.6 Using NetLogo: Information Diffusion in Small World Networks3m
2.7 Conclusions: Life in a Small World2m
Quiz1 practice exercise
Week 218m
Week
3
Hours to complete
1 hour to complete

Complex Contagions and the Weakness of Long Ties

This week will begin by discussing the limitations of simple disease-like models of social contagion, introducing the idea of “complex contagions” to model people’s frequent need for social reinforcement before spreading a piece of information or behavior. While simple contagions always spread faster as networks get smaller, this week will demonstrate the paradoxical nature of complex contagions, which can spread slower (or not at all!) in the smallest networks....
Reading
6 videos (Total 26 min), 1 quiz
Video6 videos
3.2 From Simple to Complex Contagions4m
3.3 How to Model Complex Contagions4m
3.4 Threshold Models in Networks9m
3.5 Using NetLogo: Complex Contagions in Small World Networks2m
3.6 Conclusion: The Spread of Behavior in a Complex World3m
Quiz1 practice exercise
Week 324m
Week
4
Hours to complete
1 hour to complete

Emperor's Dilemma and the Spread of Unpopular Norms

How can behaviors become popular even when most people dislike them? This week will introduce a model based on the classic allegory by Hans Christian Anderson, “The Emperor’s New Clothes.” We will first provide a conceptual overview of the model, discussing the role of private versus public beliefs and the enforcement of social norms. We will then present this model in NetLogo, showing which conditions favor the spread of unpopular behaviors....
Reading
6 videos (Total 17 min), 1 quiz
Video6 videos
4.2 Components of a Norm: Compliance and Enforcement1m
4.3 Modeling Compliance and Enforcement2m
4.4 Using NetLogo: Explaining the Spread of Unpopular Norms7m
4.5 Falsification and Sufficiency in the Emperor's Dilemma1m
4.6 Self-Reinforcing Norms: A Cautionary Conclusion1m
Quiz1 practice exercise
Week 416m
4.6
28 ReviewsChevron Right

Top Reviews

By SCJan 21st 2018

A Crisp yet effective overview of some of the most critical works in the field of Networking. Anyone from the fields of Management, Sociology, Anthropology et al should try the MOOC.

By AFNov 21st 2017

Although the course was very short and the homework were so easy, I'm quite satisfied by the insight I got from Prof Centola

Instructor

Avatar

Damon Centola

Associate Professor
Annenberg School for Communication

About University of Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn) is a private university, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. A member of the Ivy League, Penn is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States, and considers itself to be the first university in the United States with both undergraduate and graduate studies. ...

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Once you enroll for a Certificate, you’ll have access to all videos, quizzes, and programming assignments (if applicable). Peer review assignments can only be submitted and reviewed once your session has begun. If you choose to explore the course without purchasing, you may not be able to access certain assignments.

  • When you purchase a Certificate you get access to all course materials, including graded assignments. Upon completing the course, your electronic Certificate will be added to your Accomplishments page - from there, you can print your Certificate or add it to your LinkedIn profile. If you only want to read and view the course content, you can audit the course for free.

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