Created by:  University of Pennsylvania

  • David P. Silverman

    Taught by:  David P. Silverman, Eckley Brinton Coxe, Jr. Professor of Egyptology

    Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
LevelIntermediate
Language
English
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
4.5 stars
Average User Rating 4.5See what learners said
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Coursework
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University of Pennsylvania
The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn) is a private university, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. A member of the Ivy League, Penn is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States, and considers itself to be the first university in the United States with both undergraduate and graduate studies.
Ratings and Reviews
Rated 4.5 out of 5 of 538 ratings

As I was going through the course, it struck me that I was hearing almost the same thing I studied in my courses in the early 1970's in which the material for the sphinx and Giza pyramids was based on determinations by "scholars" from the 1880's and early 1900's. I was also surprised that no consideration was given for more recent re-interpretations of the timeframe for the sphinx, in view of studies done on the possible water erosion, possible reshaping of the head and so on. To me, these theories are worth mentioning as possibilities; thus, I felt some disappointment.

Nevertheless, I enjoyed the course overall and enjoyed seeing so many different artifacts that helped define different eras in the history of Egypt. I also enjoyed learning about the dig in which the university is involved. Thanks!

It was an unforgettable weekend with this course!

Good information, organized in an interesting and unique way. The graphics and labeling are beautiful.

The course is flawed, however, by the way the professor is obviously reading a script from a teleprompter. His delivery is uncomfortably slow. and. Awkward. withunatural. pauses. In. hisspeech. I wish he would just talk! He seems knowledgeable but his passion for the the subject is ruined by the stilted speech. My favorite video was the last one, where he and a lab technician are in a restoration lab, and the two of them are just talking. If the entire course had been that way, it would be a 5-star winner.

This course presents an excellent introduction for ancient Egypt. For the beginners like me, it can't be better. Thanks!