Created by:  University of Copenhagen

  • Eva Novrup  Redvall

    Taught by:  Eva Novrup Redvall, Associate Professor

    Department of Media, Cognition and Communication
LevelBeginner
Commitment3-5 hours/week
Language
English
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
4.5 stars
Average User Rating 4.5See what learners said
Syllabus

FAQs
How It Works
Coursework
Coursework

Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

Help from Your Peers
Help from Your Peers

Connect with thousands of other learners and debate ideas, discuss course material, and get help mastering concepts.

Certificates
Certificates

Earn official recognition for your work, and share your success with friends, colleagues, and employers.

Creators
University of Copenhagen
The University of Copenhagen is the oldest University in Denmark - founded in 1479, and with over 38,000 students and more than 9,000 employees. The purpose of the University is to conduct research and provide education to the highest academic level. Based in Denmark's capital city it is one of the top research institutions in Europe.
Ratings and Reviews
Rated 4.5 out of 5 of 194 ratings

Informative and a very good orientation towards the Scandinavian and in fact the European film and television scene. Also gave insights on future trends and developments. Many thanks.

wonderful light presentation of film and television from Scandinavia

I found the course to be informative and well-structured, all together a great means to begin and maintain an interest in Scandinavian Film and Television. Thanks.

Its an excellent course that gives a detailed and comprehensive overview of the major developments in Scandinavian Film and Television. there are plenty of examples , links, references and good discussion. To a large extent the course is concerned with the integrity of cultural programming that reinforces the Scandinavian nations. And I wonder are there independent filmmakers? The pace is somewhat academic rather than entertaining and sometimes the presentation suffers from the dryness and seriousness of it. I particularly liked the section on documentary and the films of Carl Dreyer.