Who is this class for: Familiarity with traditional statistical methods, such as regression models, and basic probability recommended. Familiarity with free statistical environment R recommended. Learners should successfully download R before starting the course.


Created by:  University of Pennsylvania

  • Jason A. Roy, Ph.D.

    Taught by:  Jason A. Roy, Ph.D. , Associate Professor of Biostatistics

    Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics
LevelIntermediate
Commitment5 weeks of study, 3-5 hours per week
Language
English
Hardware ReqLearners must download R, the free software environment, in order to complete assessments.
How To PassPass all graded assignments to complete the course.
User Ratings
4.9 stars
Average User Rating 4.9See what learners said
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Coursework
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Each course is like an interactive textbook, featuring pre-recorded videos, quizzes and projects.

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Creators
University of Pennsylvania
The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn) is a private university, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. A member of the Ivy League, Penn is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States, and considers itself to be the first university in the United States with both undergraduate and graduate studies.
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Ratings and Reviews
Rated 4.9 out of 5 of 10 ratings

Works best on double speed (from settings menu of each video). Content is delivered in clear and relatable manner using interesting real world examples.

In the beginning the course to me was quite difficult, as it has a different perspective on statistics I was used to. Most people tend to say: "correlation is not causality". When it came to propensity scores, matching and so on the possibilities became more clear to me to apply these methods in practice. The pace of the videos is slow, so I played the videos in 1.5 of the time. What I missed was the ability to download the slides. The instructor would look into this, but we're still waiting several weeks later. Another thing I missed was any sense how many other students were in the course.

Thanks so much for providing this great lecture.