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Social Norms, Social Change I, University of Pennsylvania

4.6
719 ratings
177 reviews

About this Course

This is a course on social norms, the rules that glue societies together. It teaches how to diagnose social norms, and how to distinguish them from other social constructs, like customs or conventions. These distinctions are crucial for effective policy interventions aimed to create new, beneficial norms or eliminate harmful ones. The course teaches how to measure social norms and the expectations that support them, and how to decide whether they cause specific behaviors. The course is a joint Penn-UNICEF project, and it includes many examples of norms that sustain behaviors like child marriage, gender violence and sanitation practices. This is Part 1 of the Social Norms, Social Change series. In these lectures, I introduce all the basic concepts and definitions, such as social expectations and conditional preferences, that help us distinguish between different types of social practices like customs, descriptive norms and social norms. Expectations and preferences can be measured, and these lectures explain how to measure them. Measurement is crucial to understanding the nature of the practice you are facing, as well as whether an intervention was or was not successful, and why. In Part 2, we will put into practice all we have learned in Part 1. New! Please use this link for a 30% discount on the recommended book that accompanies this course! https://global.oup.com/academic/product/9780190622053/?cc=us&lang=en&promocode=AAFLYG6...

Top reviews

By BB

Jan 07, 2017

This is an extremely useful course. There is an effective blend of lecture, quizzes, case studies, essays, and student discussion. The content is highly relevant. I highly recommend this course.

By SG

Nov 09, 2017

This course is both informative and practical! It manages to convey the complexity of social norm analysis and measurement while remaining accessible to students with no prior knowledge.

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167 Reviews

By ISMAEIL MOHAMMAD SOULIMAN

Dec 09, 2018

Great course

Provides very important information about human behavior in all its forms

And how to measure behavior

it is fun

By 邹知贤

Nov 11, 2018

Too much overlapping - can be good to help memorizing those complex concepts, but also annoying a bit. It can be helpful to give summary diagrams at the beginning to let the audience have a first impression of the knowledge tree.

By Hannah Abigail M. Gesmundo

Nov 04, 2018

This is a very useful and informative course for me, especially in my line of work in research and public administration. I hope more people could take this course and appreciate the process of understanding and perhaps changing social norms.

By Sami Mohammed Ali Qassabah

Oct 21, 2018

excellent

By Lorena Guadalupe Núñez Vázquez

Oct 21, 2018

What a fascinating subject! I could dedicate myself to this!

By Hafþór Líndal

Oct 16, 2018

This course is really worth your time and opens new world to your and everyone else's behaviour

By Kharingyo Shimrah

Sep 14, 2018

Great

By Hassan Ahmed Alzahrani

Sep 11, 2018

Thank your

By Mausumi Sharma

Sep 06, 2018

The Course is a proper insight of Social Norms and SocialChange.

By Byunggyu Park

Aug 29, 2018

The course systematically delves into the elements that constitute our actions and the motivations behind them. It not just explains what social norm is but also teaches ways to diagnose it properly and eventually change it for the better. It's fortunate beyond belief that Prof. Bicchieri of University of Pennsylvania, together with Coursera, has determined to open this great resource to the public nearly for free: The content, obviously made possible through years of toils, agonies, and experiences of Dr. Bicchieri, is significantly useful and critically insightful to anyone interested in human behaviours, community development and social change. Beware, however, that the contents within the course aren't well organised: You'll surely have to neatly put these lessons into the right place on your own for easier digestion. Moreover, I was less satisfied with the examples Prof. Bicchieri uses to explain the concepts. I felt there's much space for its improvement as the examples mentioned are more often confusing than not.