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Learner Reviews & Feedback for Children Acquiring Literacy Naturally by University of California, Santa Cruz

4.3
stars
79 ratings
29 reviews

About the Course

In this short course you will explore the possibility that children might acquire written language in a way that is similar to how they acquire spoken language—without instruction. You will encounter various aspects of behavioral science and technology that are relevant to this proposition. You will have the opportunity to learn the the perceptual, cognitive, and neurological capacities of children during their first years of life. You will advance your understanding of children and how they learn language. You will also be more attuned to current advances in the technology of human machine interactions, and what these phenomena imply for learning to read at an early age....

Top reviews

MS

Jun 18, 2018

It was a very interesting course that opened up my mind regarding early literacy in children. This new perspective could be a great start for further research on the topic.

SJ

Apr 17, 2020

I really enjoyed the information it was very informative and something that I can use in my personal and professional life.\n\nThank you for making this a free training!

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26 - 29 of 29 Reviews for Children Acquiring Literacy Naturally

By Marcelo B

Jun 07, 2020

Only theory, interesting but with almost no practical advice

By Lauren T

Jan 07, 2020

This course flies in the face of more than 30 years of research into how the brain learns to read. The ability to read is not acquired "naturally" as spoken language is. The brain needs to repurpose certain regions in order to link speech sounds to symbols and to store words in order to be recognized instantly. Humans, whether adults or children, do not learn to read without some form of instruction. Some may intuit the sound-letter correlations (i.e. self-teach), but most need some instruction. Please don't waste your time with the course!

By Claudia A M

Mar 05, 2019

I didn't like to participate because the approach was not good enough.

By Abigail M C

May 30, 2020

lacks informative structure and new information