About the University

University of Colorado Boulder

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About University of Colorado Boulder

About University of Colorado Boulder

The University of Colorado Boulder was recently ranked #227 on College Factual’s most recent list of the top quality schools. This puts the school in the top 15% of all colleges and universities in the country. In 2018, the prestigious Academic Ranking of World Universities listed the University of Colorado Boulder as the 38th best in the world, determined by educational quality, student training, faculty prestige, and faculty research. CU Boulder, founded in 1876 and nestled against the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, is a Research 1 institution that proudly anchors one of the most entrepreneurial technology corridors in the United States. Our faculty have launched over 140 new start-ups, our researchers have filed for 1,276 patents in the last eight years, and 548 inventions have been delivered in the last five.

We are the proud home of a community of scientists, scholars, and educators that includes five Nobel Laureates, eight MacArthur Genius Grant winners, four National Medal of Science awardees, and over eleven interdisciplinary research institutes. As one of only 34 U.S. public research institutions accepted into the prestigious Association for American Universities (AAU), the University of Colorado Boulder is committed to discovering new knowledge and solving the humanitarian, social, and technological challenges of our time. Set in one of the world's most inspiring and entrepreneurial learning environments, the University of Colorado Boulder enables each member of our community to push boundaries, explore the unknown, and change lives.

William Kuskin's article about the MS-EE on Coursera program appeared in Inside Higher Ed on October 25, 2019. William Kuskin describes the changes required in order to build an online degree from scratch to serve hundreds of students. The pilot launched October 2019 and the full degree in January 2020.

About the Electrical Computer and Energy Engineering Faculty

About the Electrical Computer and Energy Engineering Faculty

This postgraduate program is delivered by University of Colorado Boulder’s Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering—the premier undergraduate and graduate program in Colorado by reputation, rankings, and size. Nationally, the department is ranked 20th among public electrical engineering graduate programs, and 15th among public computer engineering graduate programs by U.S. News and World Report’s 2020 Best Graduate Schools.

Featured Faculty

Dr. Robert Erickson

Dr. Robert Erickson

Professor, Electrical Engineering

Robert Erickson received the B.S. (1978), M.S. (1980), and Ph.D. (1982) degrees in Electrical Engineering, from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. Since 1982, he has been a member of the faculty of electrical, computer , and energy engineering at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he served as department Chair in 2002-2006. He co-directs the Colorado Power Electronics Center and is a Fellow of the IEEE. He is the author of the textbook Fundamentals of Power Electronics, now in its second edition. Professor Erickson is the author of over one hundred journal and conference papers in the area of power electronics, is a recipient of the IEEE Power Electronics Society Transactions Prize Paper Award, and the IEEE William E. Newell Power Electronics Award, the highest honor in the power area. Both are highly distinguished awards for contributions or leadership in specific fields of interest of the IEEE.

Juliet Gopinath

Juliet Gopinath

Associate Professor

Dr. Juliet Gopinath holds a B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Minnesota and S. M. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). For several years, she was a member of technical staff at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. She is now an associate professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder in the Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering and Physics Departments.

David Sluiter

David Sluiter

Adjunct Professor

Joined the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder in the Fall of 2016. Earned B.S. in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Michigan Technological University. Worked in industry for 15 years as Sperry Univac, LSI, Seagate and SEAKR Engineering. Professor Suliter’s areas of expertise include physical layout of standard cell designs, Verilog and SystemVerilog for design, logic synthesis, static timing analysis, power analysis, test insertion and automatic test pattern generation, and constrained random verification. Additional expertise includes the storage protocols SATA, SAS and PCIe/NVMe.

Wounjhang Park

Wounjhang Park

Professor

Dr. Park's research is centered at discovering new optical phenomena and applications using nanoscale materials and structures and has currently three major thrusts: energy harvesting, nonlinear optical devices and nanomedicine. For energy harvesting, Dr. Park is developing a new type of photovoltaic devices that can efficiently convert heat into electricity by using novel nanostructures. Dr. Park is also developing nonlinear devices operating in the mid-infrared region for sensing, communications, and switching. Finally, Dr. Park is developing multifunctional nanoclusters that can enable a new imaging and therapeutic approach for bladder cancer. This technology allows for cellular level detection and targeted treatment of bladder cancer. Ph.D. in Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (June 1997) Thesis: Optical Properties of Thin Film Phosphors, Advisor: Prof. Christopher J. Summers B.S. in Physics, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea (February 1989)

Dr. Robert McLeod

Dr. Robert McLeod

Professor

Dr. McLeod received his BSEE in 1984 and MSEE in 1985 from Montana State University in Bozeman and the Ph.D. in EE in 1995 from the University of Colorado at Boulder, specializing in optical switching and computing. He has held research and management positions at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Siros Technologies (an optical data storage startup) and JDS Uniphase where he was a Director of Engineering. His research group specializes in the interaction of light and soft materials with applications to nano-lithography, 3D printing, computational imaging, regenerative medicine, integrated optics and high performance optical elements. He serves as a topical editor for the journal Optics Letters. He is currently the Richard and Joy Dorf Endowed Professor of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering and Director of the Materials Science and Engineering Program at the University of Colorado Boulder.

Jay Mendelson

Jay Mendelson

Lecturer

Jay Mendelson is an instructor at University of Colorado Boulder, where he specializes in online content development for sensor and motor technology. Prior to joining the faculty, Jay had three VP level technology positions at Cooper Wiring Devices, Brooks Instrument, and Omega Engineering. Jay is an industry expert in the design of transmitters, process controllers, pressure, thermal and flow sensors, valves, and electrical switches and connectors. He holds Bachelors (Princeton University) and Masters (Carnegie Mellon University) degrees in Mechanical Engineering. Jay has authored 3 US utility patents and 21 design patents.

James Zweighaft

James Zweighaft

Instructor

James Zweighaft is an instructor at University of Colorado Boulder, where he created and teaches the graduate course Embedding Sensors and Actuators. Prior to joining the faculty, Jim worked over 30 years as a servo engineer in computer tape drives and robotic libraries at Storage Technology, Exabyte and Benchmark. In addition, he has worked with X-ray Computed Tomography systems for Imtec and 3M corporations. Jim holds Bachelors (Stony Brook University) and Masters (Cornell University) degrees in Electrical Engineering. He has authored 28 US utility patents.

Amy Sullivan

Amy Sullivan

Research Associate

Amy Sullivan received her BA in Physics from Bates College, and her MS and PhD in Physics from the University of Colorado at Boulder. She has worked in the photonics industry in the areas of liquid crystal displays, frequency-stabilized and high power tunable infrared lasers, and machine vision imaging systems. She has taught as an assistant professor at Agnes Scott College as well as an instructor at various colleges and universities in Colorado and now works as a research associate in the Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering department at the University of Colorado.


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